Costa Concordia is towed away to Genoa for scrap


The wrecked Italian cruise ship, the Costa Concordia, is being towed on its final journey to the port of Genoa for scrapping.

Its removal is one of the biggest ever maritime salvage operations.

The Concordia struck a reef off the Italian island of Giglio in January 2012 and capsized, killing 32 people.

It was re-floated nine days ago and is being kept above the surface by giant buoyancy chambers. Over a dozen vessels will help to tow the ship.

The wreck was hauled upright in September last year but was still partially submerged, resting on six steel platforms.

The cruise ship is being towed to Genoa at two knots per hour, almost at walking pace, with an escort of more than a dozen tug boats.

The journey, which is expected to take four days, began shortly before 09:00 local time

The Concordia is set to sail 25km (15 miles) from Corsica and close to the islands of Elba and Capri before its expected arrival in Genoa late on Saturday.

Investigators are still looking for the body of Indian waiter Russel Rebello, whose body is the only one not to have been found.